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Glossary

glos-sa-ry [glos-uh-ree, glaw-suh-]

-noun, plural -ries.

1. A cohesive collection of definitions for terms used in a publication or book. 2. A list of meanings at the back of a book clarifying complicated or unfamiliar terms used within it.

P~Z

Patch Pockets

Patch Pockets

Pockets that are stitched on top of the fabric (rather than being created within the fabric) used on the back of trousers and jeans, and fronts of shirts and jackets.

Patent

Patent

Patent is a fine grain leather, which is then treated with a coating to give a sleek, shiny appearance. With wear and tear, patent leather will eventually lose its glossy finish, but should stay smooth indefinitely. It was invented in the 19th century by one Seth Boyden (not Boden…) of Newark, New Jersey who used Linseed oil lacquer to get the original shine. Nowadays the shine is thanks to clever synthetic coatings.

Peached cotton

Peached cotton

A finish applied to cotton fabrics to give them the feel, but sadly not the taste, of a peach skin. The technique involves brushing the surface of the fabric to release small soft fibres. If only the same worked on our own skin, after a stiff battering from the winds of North Acton.

Placket

Placket

A separate piece of fabric used to neaten an opening. This could be at a cuff, as on a shirt or at a neckline as on a polo shirt or a rugby shirt. Plackets are also frequently used down the front edge of men's & ladies' shirts.

Princess Seam Detail

Princess Seam Detail

These are seams which run vertically down the length of a garment, giving an almost bodice like fitted effect. We fancy they are so called because they give a fit worthy of an important member of European royalty, but we really have no concrete proof.

Printed Cow Hide

Printed Cow Hide

This is leather with fur/hair with a printed pattern. You'll often find our animal print accessories use cow hide rather than the animal imitated (e.g. leopard) as it's in a much more plentiful supply than some of its endangered (but beautifully dressed) cousins.

Raw edge trim

Raw edge trim

Any fabric edge which has not been finished by using stitching to secure it can be described as having a raw edge. A raw edge will naturally unravel and can give texture or interest to a garment. If we use a raw edge we'll typically cut the fabric in a particular way to avoid unravelling too much. Heavens knows, the last thing you want is to be left on a train platform while your skirt has made a run for it.

Resin

Resin

This is a shiny material that can be either natural (from a plant) or synthetically produced by using chemicals to modify natural fibres. Either way, it has a solid, slightly plastic appearance. Best used in statement bracelets. Ahem. Like ours.

Ribbed jersey

Ribbed jersey

Ribbed jersey has a stretch knitted into the construction to give it extra comfort. We often use it for close fitting jersey t-shirts for a snug but comfortable fit. The surface appearance is slightly grooved, and if stretched out should return to its original shape (like an accordion, without the sound).

Stab stitch

Stab stitch

A decorative, thick running stitch characterised by gaps between each stitch and usually with a heavier weight of sewing thread. You will find this mostly commonly used on the back patch pockets of jeans but be warned you may have to go around looking at bottoms to see it!

Silk Habotai

Silk Habotai

This has a soft, slinky feel and a bit of lustre to the fabric. Interestingly, the word habotai is Japanese for "soft as down", which certainly recommends it. It's often used in bridal wear, as it is light and very luxurious. For that reason it's best hand-washed or dry cleaned.

Slubby or slubbed

Slubby or slubbed

Slubby fabrics are not in the habit of lazing around the house, leaving crisp packets and dirty t shirts on the floor. Rather, they are uneven in appearance, with different types or thicknesses or yarn. Natural fibres like silk, linen or cotton are often used for their slub properties to add interest and texture to a fabric.

Tonal stitch detail

Tonal stitch detail

A decorative stitch detail with a thread that is in a different colour to the base fabric it is stitched on to. We're much taken with this neat little detail- which is why you'll find it applied with gusto on lots of our clothes.

Twill

Twill

A weave that creates a diagonal effect on the surface of the fabric. Generally, fabrics in twill are of a pretty sturdy nature, as they are fairly tightly woven. Meaning you're unlikely to find a sheer nightie in twill (should you be looking for such a thing?).

Vent back

This is a nifty tailoring technique used in skirts and outerwear to allow room for walking, and in jackets to ensure a neat fit over the bottom. The vent is a vertical gap in the hem, usually about 20cm long (just enough to give movement without over exposure).

Viscose Crepe

Viscose Crepe

A fabric where the yarns used have been twisted before weaving, which creates a slight texture on the surface of the fabric. This fabric has a soft drape, and is usually used for dresses. Not to be confused with the French crêpe, which also has a soft drape but which is liberally doused in lemon and sugar and then guzzled.

Welt

This is a cunning little detail designed to look like a pocket (but which isn't). The reason you use a faux pocket is avoid pocket bags showing through on light weight fabrics/colours.

Yoke

This is a name sometimes given to the upper part of a garment, from which the rest hangs. It is usually formed using a horizontal seam and is most commonly positioned at the shoulder below the collar, or at the hip, below the waistband.