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Glossary

glos-sa-ry [glos-uh-ree, glaw-suh-]

-noun, plural -ries.

1. A cohesive collection of definitions for terms used in a publication or book. 2. A list of meanings at the back of a book clarifying complicated or unfamiliar terms used within it.

G~O

Geelong wool

Geelong wool

Geelong wool comes (painlessly and humanely!) from the Geelong sheep which is mainly bred in Australia. It is known for its fine high quality fibre, which is expensive and very luxurious.

Georgette

Georgette

A feather light, sheer weave fabric, usually silk or viscose. Despite its whispy, delicate appearance it is surprisingly strong and springy- like a Russian gymnast.

Georgette

Grosgrain

This ungainly little word comes from the French description of a coarse texture ('grain'). It's a tightly woven fabric that has a horizontal ribbing, and is normally found in slightly shiny ribbons and trims, with a stripe to them. (E.g. the ribbon on boater hats tends to be grosgrain). It is added to our garments often in a back neck or placket to give a decorative flash of colour.

Herringbone

Herringbone

A weave effect most commonly used in tweeds, which creates a 'herringbone' pattern, like a series of Vs on the surface on the fabric. Often used in traditional British tailoring, and stomped around the countryside.

Intarsia

Intarsia

No, not a galaxy reachable by the Starship Enterprise, this is a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours within the knit itself rather than on top of it. Intarsia is a time consuming and expensive process which achieves a different result to printing or appliqué.

Jacquard

Jacquard

The technique of weaving larger and often irregular designs and colours into a fabric, normally giving quite an opulent look.

Jetted pocket

Jetted pocket

This is a method of finishing a pocket mouth using two separate pieces of fabric, to neaten both the top and bottom of the cut in the fabric. The pocket effectively looks like a mouth with a top & bottom lip.

Jersey

Jersey

Jersey usually refers to a machine knitted fabric. By virtue of its knitted construction it has more stretch than a woven fabric and is commonly used in t-shirts and easy fit dresses.

Single jersey

This is a plain jersey knit which has a flat appearance and can offer fantastic draping qualities. It doesn't tend to be as stretchy as jersey blends.

Lurex

Lurex

Lurex is a branded name for a type of yarn with a metallic appearance, adding a wink of discreet glitter and glitz to a garment without the merest hint of cruise ship entertainer.

Lyocell

Lyocell

This is a man made fibre, originally from wood pulp cellulose. This is magically treated to make it silky soft, absorbent, and pleasingly drapey. It is extremely flattering. And with clothes, flattery will get you everywhere. Tencel® is a brand name for Lyocell.

Marl

Marl

Marl is usually two different coloured yarns twisted together and knitted as a single yarn to create an interesting two tone, slightly flecked fabric. It is particularly common, but uncommonly nice, in grey knits.

Melange

Melange

A blend of coloured fibres that have been twisted together into one yarn. Gives a mottled, soft appearance to the colour. It's more expensive than a plain blend but a top favourite of Johnnie's so you’ll see a fair bit in the range.

Mercerised Cotton

Mercerised cotton

To mercerize is to treat something with the aim of preparing or improving it (although it does sound like something that might eliminate a superhero). Mercerised cotton has been treated to strengthen and improve the lustre and fix the dyeing properties. It can also help to reduce pilling and generally gives a slight sheen to the fabric, increasing resilience and smiles all round.

Merino

Merino wool comes from Merino sheep which is most commonly bred in warm climates such as Australia and New Zealand. Merino is regarded as one of the finest and softest wools.

Multi faceted

Multi faceted

Something that has many sides to it, often a bead. Rather like a disco ball.

Multi-stitch

This is a decorative technique that uses more than one row of stitching. When we’re overtaken by a moment of caprice, we sometimes use different colours each row.

Metallic Leather

Metallic Leather

This is leather with a thin layer of, you guessed it, metallic colour applied to the surface to give it a shiny finish. This is how we achieve our high shine gold and silver colours in leather.

Nubuck

Nubuck

This is leather that has been sanded or buffed on the outside surface to give a slight bristliness to its short fibers, producing a velvet-like surface. Nubuck is similar to suede, but its texture is finer. It differs in that suede is created from the inner side of a hide, whereas nubuck is created from the outer side of a hide.